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MEET THE STS-92 CREW

 

Commander Brian Duffy
Pilot Pamela Ann Melroy
Mission Specialist Koichi Wakata
Mission Specialist Leroy Chiao
Mission Specialist Peter J.K. "Jeff" Wisoff
Mission Specialist Michael E. Lopez-Alegria
Mission Specialist William Surles "Bill" McArthur, Jr.

NAME: Brian Duffy (Colonel, USAF)[Brian Duffy]
NASA Astronaut

PERSONAL DATA: Born June 20, 1953, in Boston, Massachusetts. Married to the former Janet M. Helms of West Lafayette, Indiana. They have two children. He enjoys golf, running, and reading. His mother, Mrs. Anne C. Duffy, resides in Hingham, Massachusetts. His father, Mr. Daniel E. Duffy, is deceased. Her parents, Mr. & Mrs. John J. Helms, reside in Ft. Myers, Florida.

EDUCATION: Graduated from Rockland High School, Rockland, Massachusetts, in 1971; received a bachelor of science degree in mathematics from the United States Air Force (USAF) Academy in 1975, and a master of science degree in systems management from the University of Southern California in 1981.

ORGANIZATIONS: Member of the United States Air Force Academy Association of Graduates, the Air Force Association, and the Association of Space Explorers.

SPECIAL HONORS: Distinguished Graduate of USAF Undergraduate Pilot Training where he was awarded the UPT Flying Training Award. Distinguished Graduate of USAF Test Pilot School Class 82B. Awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross, Defense Meritorious Service Medal, Defense Superior Service Medal, Air Force Meritorious Service Medal, Air Force Commendation Medal, and NASA Space Flight Medals.

EXPERIENCE: Duffy graduated from the USAF Academy in 1975. He completed Undergraduate Pilot Training at Columbus Air Force Base, Mississippi, in 1976, and was selected to fly the F-15. He was stationed at Langley Air Force Base, Virginia, until 1979. At the end of 1979 he transferred to Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, Japan. He flew F-15's there until 1982 when he was selected to attend the U.S. Air Force Test Pilot School. Following graduation, he served as the Director of F-15 Tests at Eglin Air Force Base, Florida.

He has logged over 5,000 hours of flight time in more than 25 different aircraft.

NASA EXPERIENCE: Selected by NASA in June 1985, Duffy became an astronaut in July 1986. Since then, he has participated in the development and testing of displays, flight crew procedures, and computer software to be used on Shuttle flights. He also has been a spacecraft communicator (CAPCOM) in Mission Control during numerous Space Shuttle missions, served as Assistant Director (Technical) and, most recently, was the Deputy Director (Acting) of the Johnson Space Center. In this role he assisted the Center Director in the direction and management of JSC's resources, functions, and programs and projects assigned to the Center. A veteran of three space flights, he has logged over 667 hours in space. Duffy was the pilot on STS-45 (March 24 to April 2, 1992), the first of the ATLAS series of missions to address the atmosphere and its interaction with the Sun. He also was the pilot on STS-57 (June 21 to July 1, 1993). Mission highlights included retrieval of the European Retrievable Carrier with the Shuttle's robotic arm, a spacewalk by two crew members, and an assortment of experiments in the first flight of the Spacehab middeck augmentation module. Duffy commanded a six-man crew aboard Endeavour on STS-72 (January 11-20, 1996). During the 9-day flight the crew aboard Endeavour retrieved the Space Flyer Unit (launched from Japan 10-months earlier), deployed and retrieved the OAST-Flyer, and conducted two spacewalks to demonstrate and evaluate techniques to be used in the assembly of the International Space Station.

Colonel Duffy will command the crew of STS-92 on the third Space Shuttle mission to assemble the International Space Station. Launch is scheduled for late 2000.

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NAME: Pamela Ann Melroy (Lieutenant Colonel, USAF)[Pamela Melroy]
NASA Astronaut

PERSONAL DATA: Born September, 17, 1961, in Palo Alto, California. Considers Rochester, New York, to be her hometown. Married to Christopher Wallace of Wilton, Connecticut. She enjoys theatre, tap and jazz dancing, reading, cooking, flying. Her parents, David and Helen Melroy, reside in upstate New York.

EDUCATION: Graduated from Bishop Kearney High School, Rochester, New York, in 1979. Bachelor of science degree in physics and astronomy from Wellesley College, 1983. Master of science degree in earth & planetary sciences from Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1984.

ORGANIZATIONS: Member of the Society of Experimental Test Pilots, the Order of Daedalians, and the 99s.

SPECIAL HONORS: Recipient of the Air Force Meritorious Service Medal, First Oak Leaf Cluster; Air Medal, First Oak Leaf Cluster; Aerial Achievement Medal, First Oak Leaf Cluster; and Expeditionary Medal, First Oak Leaf Cluster.

EXPERIENCE: Melroy was commissioned through the Air Force ROTC program in 1983. After completing a masters degree, she attended Undergraduate Pilot Training at Reese Air Force Base in Lubbock, Texas and was graduated in 1985. She flew the KC-10 for six years at Barksdale Air Force Base in Bossier City, Louisiana, as a copilot, aircraft commander and instructor pilot. Melroy is a veteran of JUST CAUSE and DESERT SHIELD/DESERT STORM, with over 200 combat and combat support hours. In June 1991, she attended the Air Force Test Pilot School at Edwards Air Force Base, California. Upon her graduation, she was assigned to the C-17 Combined Test Force, where she served as a test pilot until her selection for the astronaut program. She has logged over 4,000 hours flight time in over 45 different aircraft.

NASA EXPERIENCE: Selected as an astronaut candidate by NASA in December 1994, Melroy reported to the Johnson Space Center in March 1995. She completed a year of training and evaluation and is qualified for flight assignment as a shuttle pilot. Initially assigned to astronaut support duties for launch and landing, she has also worked Advanced Projects for the Astronaut Office. Melroy is currently assigned as pilot on STS-92, the third Space Shuttle mission to assemble the International Space Station, scheduled for launch in late 2000.

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NAME: Koichi Wakata[[$B<cED8w0l(J]]
NASDA Astronaut

PERSONAL DATA: Born August 1, 1963, in Omiya, Saitama, Japan. Married to the former Stefanie von Sachsen-Altenburg of Bonn, Germany. They have one son. He enjoys flying, hang-gliding, baseball, tennis, and snow skiing. His mother, Mrs. Takayo Wakata, resides in Omiya, Saitama, Japan. His father, Mr. Nobutaka Wakata, is deceased.

EDUCATION: Graduated from Urawa High School, Saitama, in 1982; received a bachelor of science degree in aeronautical engineering from Kyushu University in 1987; and a master of science degree in applied mechanics from Kyushu University in 1989.

ORGANIZATIONS: Member of the Japan Society for Aeronautical and Space Sciences, the Robotics Society of Japan, and the Japanese Society for Biological Sciences in Space.

SPECIAL HONORS: Minister of State for Science and Technology Commendation. Special awards from Saitama Prefecture and Omiya City. National Space Development Agency of Japan Outstanding Service Award (1996). Diplome pilote-cosmonaute de l' URSS V.M. Komarov(1997).

EXPERIENCE: Wakata joined Japan Airlines (JAL) in April 1989. He was assigned to the Base Maintenance Department, Narita, Chiba, where he was designated as a structural engineer. From July 1991 to May 1992, Wakata was assigned to the Airframe Group, Systems Engineering Office, Engineering Department of JAL. During his tenure with JAL, Wakata was involved in the research of structural integrity of transport aircraft, fatigue fracture, corrosion prevention program, and the environmental effects on fuselage polished aluminum skin on B-747, B-767 and DC-10 aircraft. He was selected as an astronaut candidate by the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) in June 1992. A multi-engine and instrument rated pilot, Wakata has logged over 1100 hours in a variety of aircraft.

NASA EXPERIENCE: Wakata reported to the NASA Johnson Space Center in August 1992. He completed one year of training and is qualified for assignment as a mission specialist on future Space Shuttle flight crews. Wakata's technical assignments to date include: payload science support for the Astronaut Office Mission Development Branch (April 1993 to February 1995); Space Shuttle flight software verification testing in the Shuttle Avionics Integration Laboratory (SAIL) (April to October 1994); Space Shuttle and Space Station Robotics for the Astronaut Office Robotics Branch (March 1996 to date). Wakata was the NASDA Assistant Payload Operation Director of the Manipulator Flight Demonstration, a robotic arm experiment for the Japanese Experiment Module of the International Space Station, on STS-85 (August 7-19, 1997).

Wakata flew as the first Japanese mission specialist on STS-72 (January 11-20, 1996), aboard Endeavour. During the 9-day flight the crew retrieved the Space Flyer Unit (launched from Japan 10-months earlier), deployed and retrieved the OAST-Flyer, and conducted two spacewalks to demonstrate and evaluate techniques to be used in the assembly of the International Space Station. In completing his first space flight, Wakata has logged a total of 214 hours and 41 seconds in space.

Wakata is currently assigned as a mission specialist on STS-92, scheduled for launch in late 2000. During this mission, the crew will continue assembly of the International Space Station

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NAME: Leroy Chiao (Ph.D.)[Leroy Chiao]
NASA Astronaut

PERSONAL DATA: Born August 28, 1960, in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, but considers Danville, California, to be his hometown. Single. He enjoys flying, basketball, racquetball, and skiing.

EDUCATION: Graduated from Monte Vista High School, Danville, California, in 1978; received a bachelor of science degree in chemical engineering from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1983, and a master of science degree and a doctorate in chemical engineering from the University of California, Santa Barbara, in 1985 and 1987, respectively.

SPECIAL HONORS: Invited to give technical seminars on honeycomb material and bonded panels, and cure modeling of aerospace composite materials, at the Beijing Institute of Aeronautical Materials, and at the Changsha Institute of Technology, 5th Department, in the Peoples Republic of China. Invited contributor to the International Encyclopedia of Composite Materials. Listed in Who's Who in Science and Engineering. Recipient of Distinguished Alumni Award from University of California, Santa Barbara. Keynote Commencement Speaker for the Departments of Engineering at the University of California at Berkeley, and at Santa Barbara, in 1996.

EXPERIENCE: Dr. Chiao graduated in 1987 from the University of California at Santa Barbara, and joined the Hexcel Corporation in Dublin, California. He worked for Hexcel until 1989, during which time he was involved in process, manufacturing, and engineering research on advanced aerospace materials; worked on a joint NASA-JPL/Hexcel project to develop a practical, optically correct, precision segment reflector, made entirely of advanced polymer composite materials, for future space telescopes; as well as working on cure modeling and finite element analysis. In January of 1989 Dr. Chiao joined the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Livermore, California, where he was involved in processing research for fabrication of filament-wound and thick-section aerospace composites. Dr. Chiao also developed and demonstrated a mechanistic cure model for graphite fiber/epoxy composite material. An instrument-rated pilot, Dr. Chiao has logged over 1500 flight hours in a variety of aircraft.

NASA EXPERIENCE: Selected by NASA in January 1990, Dr. Chiao became an astronaut in July 1991. He is qualified for flight assignment as a mission specialist. His technical assignments to date include: Space Shuttle flight software verification in the Shuttle Avionics Integration Laboratory (SAIL); crew equipment, Spacelab, Spacehab and payloads issues for the Astronaut Office Mission Development Branch; Training and Flight Data File issues; EVA issues for the EVA Branch. A veteran of two space flights, he flew as a mission specialist on STS-65 in 1994 and STS-72 in 1996. Dr. Chiao has logged 567 hours, 55 minutes, 41 seconds in space, including two space walks totaling just over 13 hours. Dr. Chiao is assigned as a mission specialist on STS-92, the second Space Shuttle mission to assemble the International Space Station. Launch is scheduled for late 2000.

SPACE FLIGHT EXPERIENCE: STS-65 (July 8-23, 1994) launched from and returned to land at the Kennedy Space Center, Florida, setting a new flight duration record for the Space Shuttle program at that time. The STS-65 mission flew the second International Microgravity Laboratory (IML-2). During the 15-day flight the seven-member crew aboard Columbia conducted more than 80 experiments focusing on materials and life sciences research in microgravity. The mission was accomplished in 236 orbits of the Earth, traveling 6.1 million miles in 353 hours and 55 minutes.

STS-72 (January 11-20, 1996) was a 9-day mission during which the crew aboard Endeavour retrieved the Space Flyer Unit (launched from Japan 10-months earlier), and deployed and retrieved the OAST-Flyer. Dr. Chiao performed two spacewalks designed to demonstrate tools and hardware, and evaluate techniques to be used in the assembly of the International Space Station. In completing this mission, Dr. Chiao logged a total of 214 hours and 41 seconds in space, including just over 13 EVA hours, and traveled 3.7 million miles in 142 orbits of the Earth.

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NAME:Peter J.K. "Jeff" Wisoff (Ph.D)[Jeff Wisoff]
NASA Astronaut

PERSONAL DATA: Born August 16, 1958, in Norfolk, Virginia. Married to Tamara E. Jernigan. He enjoys scuba diving, racquetball, swimming, and sailing. His parents, Carl & Pat Wisoff, reside in Norfolk.

EDUCATION: Graduated from Norfolk Academy, Norfolk, Virginia, in 1976; received a bachelor of science degree in physics (with Highest Distinction) from University of Virginia in 1980, a master of science degree and a doctorate in applied physics from Stanford University in 1982 and 1986 respectively.

SPECIAL HONORS: NASA Space Flight Medals (1993, 1994, 1997); NCR Faculty Award of Excellence (1989); National Science Foundation Graduate Fellowship 1980-1983; Physics Prize and Shannon Award from the University of Virginia (1980). Selected to Phi Beta Kappa in 1979.

EXPERIENCE: After graduating from the University of Virginia in 1976, Dr. Wisoff began his graduate work on the development of short wavelength lasers at Stanford University as a National Science Foundation Graduate Fellow. Upon completing his master's and doctorate degrees at Stanford in 1986, Dr. Wisoff joined the faculty of the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department at Rice University. His research focused on the development of new vacuum ultraviolet and high intensity laser sources. In addition, he also collaborated with researchers from regional Texas Medical Centers on the applications of lasers to the reconstruction of damaged nerves. He has recently collaborated with researchers at Rice University on new techniques for growing and evaluating semiconductor materials using lasers. Dr. Wisoff has contributed numerous papers at technical conferences and in journals in the areas of lasers and laser applications.

NASA EXPERIENCE: Selected by NASA in January 1990, Dr. Wisoff became an astronaut in July 1991. He is qualified for flight assignment as a mission specialist. His technical assignments to date include: spacecraft communicator (CAPCOM) in Mission Control; flight software verification in the Shuttle Avionics Integration Laboratory (SAIL); coordinating flight crew equipment; evaluating extravehicular activity (EVA) equipment and techniques for the construction of Space Station; lead for the Payloads and Habitability Branch of the Astronaut Office. A veteran of three space flights, STS-57 in 1993, STS-68 in 1994 and STS-81 in 1997, Dr. Wisoff has logged over 754 hours in space. Dr. Wisoff is assigned as a mission specialist on STS-92, the third Space Shuttle mission to assemble the International Space Station. Launch is scheduled for late 2000.

SPACE FLIGHT EXPERIENCE: STS-57 Endeavour (June 21 to July 1, 1993) launched from and returned to land at the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. The primary objective of this flight was the retrieval of the European Retrievable Carrier satellite (EURECA) using the RMS. Additionally, this mission featured the first flight of Spacehab, a commercially-provided middeck augmentation module for the conduct of microgravity experiments. Spacehab carried 22 individual flight experiments in materials and life sciences research. During the mission Wisoff conducted a 5-hour, 50-minute spacewalk during which the EURECA communications antennas were manually positioned for latching, and various extravehicular activity tools and techniques were evaluated for use on future missions. Mission accomplished in 155 orbits of the Earth in 239 hours and 45 minutes.

STS-68 (September 30 to October 11, 1994) was the Space Radar Lab-2 (SRL-2) mission. As part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth, SRL-2 was the second flight of three advanced radars called SIR-C/X-SAR (Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar), and a carbon-monoxide pollution sensor, MAPS (Measurement of Air Pollution from Satellites). SIR-C/X-SAR and MAPS operated together in Endeavour's cargo bay to study Earth's surface and atmosphere, creating radar images of Earth's surface environment and mapping global production and transport of carbon monoxide pollution. Real-time crew observations of environmental conditions, along with over 14,000 photographs aided the science team in interpreting the SRL data. The SRL-2 mission was a highly successful test of technology intended for long-term environmental and geological monitoring of planet Earth. Following 183 orbits of the Earth in 269 hours and 46 minutes, the eleven-day mission ended with Space Shuttle Endeavour landing at Edwards Air Force Base, California.

STS-81 (January 12-22, 1997) was a ten-day mission, the fifth to dock with Russia's Space Station Mir, and the second to exchange U.S. astronauts. The mission also carried the Spacehab double module providing additional middeck locker space for secondary experiments. In five days of docked operations more than three tons of food, water, experiment equipment and samples were moved back and forth between the two spacecraft. Following 160 orbits of the Earth in 244 hours, 55 minutes, the STS-81 mission concluded with a landing on Kennedy Space Center's Runway 33 ending a 3.9 million mile journey.

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NAME: Michael E. Lopez-Alegria (Commander, USN)[Mike Lopez-Alegria]
NASA Astronaut

PERSONAL DATA: Born May 30, 1958, in Madrid, Spain. Considers both Madrid, and Mission Viejo, California, to be his hometowns. Married to the former Daria Robinson of Geneva, Switzerland. They have one son. Michael enjoys sports, traveling, cooking. His father, Eladio Lopez-Alegria, resides in Madrid. His mother, Louise Lopez-Alegria, is deceased. Her parents, Professor Stuart and Margareta Robinson, reside in Geneva.

EDUCATION: Graduated from Mission Viejo High School, Mission Viejo, California, in 1976; received a bachelor of science degree in systems engineering from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1980; a master of science degree in aeronautical engineering from the U.S. Naval Postgraduate School in 1988.

ORGANIZATIONS: Member, Society of Experimental Test Pilots; Association of Naval Aviation.

EXPERIENCE: Following flight training, Lopez-Alegria was designated a Naval Aviator on September 4, 1981. He then served as a flight instructor in Pensacola, Florida, until March 1983. His next assignment was to a fleet electronic reconnaissance squadron in Rota, Spain. There he served as a pilot and mission commander aboard EP-3E aircraft, flying missions in the Mediterranean Sea, North Atlantic, Baltic Sea and Central America. In 1986 he was assigned to a two year cooperative program between the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, California, and the U.S. Naval Test Pilot School in Patuxent River, Maryland. His final tour before being assigned to NASA was at the Naval Air Test Center as an engineering test pilot and program manager. He has accumulated 4,000 pilot hours in over 30 different aircraft types.

NASA EXPERIENCE: Selected by NASA in March 1992, Lopez-Alegria reported for training to the Johnson Space Center in August 1992. Following one year of training and designation as an astronaut, he was assigned as the Astronaut Office technical point of contact to the Space Shuttle Orbiter, Main Engine, Solid Rocket Booster and External Tank projects. His next assignment was to the Kennedy Space Center where he provided crew representation on orbiter processing issues and provided direct crew support during launches and landings.

From October 20 to November 5, 1995, Lopez-Alegria served as a mission specialist and flight engineer aboard Space Shuttle Columbia on STS-73, the second United States Microgravity Laboratory mission. The mission focused on materials science, biotechnology, combustion science, the physics of fluids, and numerous scientific experiments housed in the pressurized Spacelab module. Lopez-Alegria served as the flight engineer during the ascent and entry phases of flight, and was responsible for all operations of the "blue" shift on orbit. In completing his first space flight, Lopez-Alegria orbited the Earth 256 times, traveled over 6 million miles, and logged a total of 15 days, 21 hours, 52 minutes and 21 seconds in space.

Most recently, Lopez-Alegria served as NASA Director of Operations at the Yuri Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center, Star City, Russia. He is currently assigned as a mission specialist on STS-92 scheduled for launch in late 2000.

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NAME: William Surles "Bill" McArthur, Jr., (Colonel, USA)[Bill McArthur]
NASA Astronaut

PERSONAL DATA: Born July 26, 1951, in Laurinburg, North Carolina. His hometown is Wakulla, North Carolina. Married to the former Cynthia Kathryn Lovin of Red Springs, North Carolina. They have two daughters. He enjoys basketball, running, and working with personal computers. Bill's stepfather, Mr. Weldon C. Avant, resides in Red Springs. His parents, Brigadier General William S. McArthur and Mrs. Edith P. Avant, are deceased. Cynthia's mother, Mrs. A.K. Lovin, resides in Red Springs, North Carolina.

EDUCATION: Graduated from Red Springs High School, Red Springs, North Carolina, in 1969; received a bachelor of science degree in applied science and engineering from the United States Military Academy, West Point, New York, in 1973, and a master of science degree in aerospace engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology in 1983.

ORGANIZATIONS: Member of the American Institute of Aeronautics & Astronautics (AIAA), the Army Aviation Association of America, the Association of the United States Army, the United States Military Academy Association of Graduates, the West Point Society of Greater Houston, MENSA, Phi Kappa Phi, and the Association of Space Explorers.

SPECIAL HONORS: Recipient of the Defense Superior Service Medal, the Defense Meritorious Service Medal, the Meritorious Service Medal (First Oak Leaf Cluster), the Army Commendation Medal, the NASA Space Flight Medal, and the NASA Exceptional Service Medal. Distinguished Graduate of the U.S. Army Aviation School. Honorary Doctor of Science degree from the University of North Carolina at Pembroke. Recipient of the Order of the Long Leaf Pine, North Carolina's highest civilian award. Member of the Georgia Tech Academy of Distinguished Engineering Alumni. 1996 American Astronautical Society Flight Achievement Award. Recipient of the Ellis Island Medal of Honor.

EXPERIENCE: McArthur graduated from West Point in June 1973 and was commissioned as a Second Lieutenant in the U.S. Army. Following a tour with the 82nd Airborne Division at Fort Bragg, North Carolina, he entered the U.S. Army Aviation School in 1975. He was the top graduate of his flight class and was designated an Army aviator in June 1976. He subsequently served as an aeroscout team leader and brigade aviation section commander with the 2nd Infantry Division in the Republic of Korea. In 1978 he was assigned to the 24th Combat Aviation Battalion in Savannah, Georgia, where he served as a company commander, platoon leader, and operations officer. After completing studies at Georgia Tech, he was assigned to the Department of Mechanics at West Point as an assistant professor. In June 1987, he graduated from the U.S. Naval Test Pilot School and was designated an experimental test pilot. Other military schools completed include the Army Parachutist Course, the Jumpmaster Course, and the Command and General Staff Officers' Course.

A Master Army Aviator, he has logged over 4000 flight hours in 37 different aircraft.

NASA EXPERIENCE: McArthur was assigned to NASA at the Johnson Space Center in August 1987 as a Space Shuttle vehicle integration test engineer. Duties involved engineering liaison for launch and landing operations of the Space Shuttle. He was actively involved in the integrated test of the flight control system for each Orbiter for its return to flight and was a member of the Emergency Escape and Rescue Working Group.

Selected by NASA in January 1990, McArthur became an astronaut in July 1991. Since then, McArthur has held various assignments within the Astronaut Office including: working issues relating to the solid rocket booster, redesigned solid rocket motor, and the advanced solid rocket motor. Most recently, he served as Chief of the Astronaut Office Flight Support Branch, supervising astronaut support of the Mission Control Center, prelaunch Space Shuttle processing, and launch and landing operations. A veteran of two space flights, McArthur has logged 354 orbits of the Earth, traveled 9.2 million miles in 22 days, 4 hours, 44 minutes and 45 seconds.

McArthur served as a mission specialist on STS-58 on the seven-person life science research mission aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia, launching from the Kennedy Space Center on October 18, 1993, and landing at Edwards Air Force Base on November 1, 1993. The crew performed neurovestibular, cardiovascular, cardiopulmonary, metabolic, and musculoskeletal medical experiments on themselves and 48 rats, expanding our knowledge of human and animal physiology both on earth and in space flight. In addition, the crew performed 16 engineering tests aboard the Orbiter Columbia and 20 Extended Duration Orbiter Medical Project experiments. Additionally, the crew made extensive contacts with school children and amateur radio operators around the world through the Shuttle Amateur Radio experiment. The mission was accomplished in 225 orbits of the Earth in 336 hours, 13 minutes, 01 second.

Most recently, McArthur served as a mission specialist on STS-74, NASA's second Space Shuttle mission to rendezvous and dock with the Russian Space Station Mir. STS-74 launched on November 12, 1995, and landed at Kennedy Space Center on November 20, 1995. During the 8-day flight the crew aboard Atlantis successfully attached a permanent docking module to Mir, conducted experiments on a number of secondary payloads, and transferred one and a half tons of supplies between Atlantis and Mir. The STS-74 mission was accomplished in 129 orbits of the Earth, traveling 3.4 million miles in 196 hours, 30 minutes, 44 seconds.

Currently, McArthur is assigned as a mission specialist on STS-92, scheduled for launch in late 2000. During this mission, the crew of Discovery will continue assembly of the International Space Station.

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